Publié le Laisser un commentaire

SHTF Survivalist Radio Frequency Lists


Frequency List for SHTF Survivalist Radio Communications and Preppers
Information about common frequencies and channels for tactical, emergency, and survival for HAM, CB, MURS, GMRS, PMR, Marine, and other radios.
SHTF Survival Radios
SHTF Survivalist Radio Frequency List and Charts for the doomsday prepper…

©2013 RadioMaster Reports

CLICK TO PRINT WALLET SIZE – SHTF FREQUENCY LIST – Prepper Survivalist Channel Frequencies Chart VHF UHF HF CB MARINE HAM FRS GMRS PMR MURS FM SSB AM
CLICK TO PRINT WALLET SIZE – SHTF FREQUENCY LIST
Prepper Survivalist Channel Frequencies Basic Chart
VHF UHF HF CB MARINE HAM FRS GMRS PMR MURS FM SSB AM
SHTF FREQUENCY LIST - Prepper Survivalist Channel Frequencies Chart VHF UHF HF CB MARINE HAM FRS GMRS PMR MURS FM SSB AM

The original source of this article and chart is RadioMaster Reports.

==== SHTF SURVIVALIST RADIO FREQUENCY LIST BASIC CHART ====
=== BAND === | CHAN. | FREQUENCY MHZ| DESCRIPTION
============ | ===== | ============ | ==================
FRS UHF ==== | FRS 3 | 462.6125 FM =| PREPPER
GMRS UHF === |GMRS17 | 462.6000 FM =| SURVIVALIST
PMR UHF ==== | PMR 3 | 446.03125FM =| SURVIVALIST PREPR
MURS VHF === |MURS 3 | 151.9400 FM =| SURVIVALIST PREPR
CB AM ====== |CB 3AM | 026.9850 AM =| PREPPER
CB AM ====== |CB 9AM | 027.0650 AM =| HIGHWAY SAFETY
CB SSB ===== |CB 37U | 027.3750 USB | SURVIVALIST PREPR
CB FREEBAND= |FB425U | 027.4250 USB | SURVIVALIST PREPR
LOWBAND VHF= |LOW334 | 033.4000 FM =| SURVIVALIST
HAM UHF ==== |HAM U3 | 446.0300 FM =| PREPPER
HAM VHF ==== |HAM 42 | 146.4200 FM =| PREPPER
HAM VHF ==== |HAM 52 | 146.5200 FM =| HAM CALLING
HAM VHF ==== |HAM 55 | 146.5500 FM =| SURVIVALIST
HAM HF ===== |HAM10M | 028.3050 USB | SURVIVALIST PREPR
HAM HF ===== |HAM20M | 014.2420 USB | PREPPER
HAM HF ===== |HAM40M | 007.2420 LSB | PREPPER
HAM HF ===== |HAM60M | 005.3570 USB | SURVIVALIST NVIS
HAM HF ===== |HAM80M | 003.8180 LSB | PREPPER
LAND SAR VHF |SAREMT | 155.1600 FM =| SEARCH AND RESCUE
MARINE VHF = |MAR 16 | 156.8000 FM =| SAFETY CALLING
MARINE VHF - |MAR 72 | 156.6250 FM =| BOAT PREPPER
The source of this chart is RadioMaster Reports.
Updated 2015. Entered into public domain. Free to copy.

SHTF SURVIVALIST PREPPER FREQUENCY LIST

HF VHF UHF CSV FILE FOR PROGRAMMING RADIOS 

CLICK TO PRINT – SHTF FREQUENCY LIST – Survivalist Prepper Channel Frequencies Chart VHF UHF HF CB MARINE HAM FRS GMRS PMR MURS FM SSB AM

Background Notes and History of These Frequencies

Reference: First-hand physical research, correspondence, and open public domain sources 1997-2013. Updated NOV-2013. The basic SHTF Survivalist Radio Frequency List chart was entered into the public domain 2013 by Radiomaster Reports.

Low Band VHF Frequencies:

Radio Bunker at Bug Out Location 2 during SHTF Test Drill

Radio Bunker at Bug Out Location 2 during SHTF Test Drill

LOWBAND VHF | LOW334 | 033.4000 FM | SHTF SURVIVAL
33.4 MHz is an ancient Low Band VHF FM itinerant business channel with a 1 watt limit. Popular among reenactors, survivalists, and bulletproof-radio enthusiasts using old military surplus manpacks or military handheld sets on this channel (especially PRC-77). The reason they use 33.4 is probably because it is the only low power itinerant channel that old green manpacks can select with their 50 kHz or 25 kHz channel spacing dials. At low power in the field, they aren’t bothering anybody. Useful for patrols and tactical communications. All scanners can receive this channel.

Preppers Test Out Military Surplus Low Band VHF Radios on SHTF Survival channel 33.400 MHz FM Simplex

Preppers Test Out Military Surplus Low Band VHF Radios on SHTF Survival channel 33.400 MHz FM Simplex

Radio Bunker at Bug Out Location 3 during SHTF Test Drill

Radio Bunker at Bug Out Location 3 during SHTF Test Drill

Some interesting older “green” military surplus radios common for Low Band VHF frequencies:
Military manpack set PRC-9, AN/PRC-9 (27.0-38.9 MHz FM) continuously tunable
Military manpack set PRC-10, AN/PRC-10 (38.0 to 54.9 MHz) continuously tunable
Military manpack set PRC-77, AN/PRC-77 (30-52.95; 53-75.95 MHz FM) channel spacing 50 kHz
Military manpack set PRC-25, AN/PRC-25 (30-52.95; 53-75.95 MHz FM) channel spacing 50 kHz
Military handheld set PRC-68, AN/PRC-68, PRC-68A, PRC-68B (30-79.975 MHz FM) channel spacing 50/25/12.5 kHz
Military handheld set RT-1547/PRC-126, AN/PRC-126 (30-88 MHz FM) channel spacing 25 kHz
Military handheld set AN/PRC-128 (30-88 MHz FM) channel spacing 12.5 kHz
Military manpack set AN/PRC-119 (30-87.95 MHz) channel spacing 25KHz
Military radio set AN/PRC-117 (30-90 MHz) channel spacing 25KHz

Radio Bunker at Bug Out Location 1 during SHTF Test Drill

Radio Bunker at Bug Out Location 1 during SHTF Test Drill

High Band VHF Frequencies:

MURS VHF | MURS 3 | 151.940 FM | MURS PREPPER PRIMARY 
151.940 MHz FM is the MURS Prepper channel, known as MURS Channel 3. Multi-Use Radio Service (MURS) is an unlicensed two-way radio service similar to CB but on VHF FM.  It is in wide use by preppers and survivalists. VHF has longer distance range in rural and suburban areas than either FRS or GMRS. Useful for mobile, base, patrols, practice drills, and tactical communications. Most scanners can receive this channel.

MURS VHF | MURS 4 | 154.570 FM | MURS PREPPER
154.570 MHz FM is the MURS Survivalist channel, known as MURS Channel 4 or the Blue Dot ☀ Channel. Multi-Use Radio Service (MURS) is an unlicensed two-way radio service similar to CB but on VHF FM.  It is in  use by some preppers, and has much better distance range in rural and suburban areas than UHF, FRS or GMRS. Useful for mobile, base, patrols, and tactical communications. Most scanners can receive this channel.

LAND SAR VHF | SAREMT | 155.1600 FM | SEARCH & RESCUE
155.16 MHz FM Simplex is Emergency Only. SAR (Search And Rescue) National interoperability channel in USA for ground search teams. It is widely used by government and civilian SAR teams for field communications and interaction with governmental, law enforcement, or fire operations in the field. This channel is also known as Ground SAR, Land SAR, and identified in agency radios with the channel name SAR WFM or SAR NFM. It requires an FCC license to transmit on it, and should never be used by unlicensed operators, except in life-threatening emergency to communicate with a Search & Rescue unit. All scanners can receive this channel.

MARINE VHF | MAR 16 | 156.8000 FM | SAFETY CALLING
156.800 MHz FM Simplex is VHF marine channel 16, the international primary Marine Safety, Emergency, and Distress guard channel worldwide. It is widely used and monitored by all boats, ships, and watercraft. Coast Guards monitor this channel, and it is audio-recorded in major ports. All scanners can receive this channel.

Marine_Channel_16_Distress_Calling

MARINE VHF | MAR 72 | 156.6250 FM | BOAT PREPPER
156.625 MHz FM Simplex is VHF marine channel 72, an international ship-to-ship or HT channel worldwide. It is widely used on sailboats, motor boats, yachts, and watercraft. It is designated for non-commercial use, is common for HT-to-HT informal communications, and is normally clear of commercial shipping or port operations. It is usually not monitored by coast guards, but it is audio-recorded in major ports. All scanners can receive this channel.

HAM Prepper SHTF Survival Channel 146.550 FM Simplex

HAM Prepper SHTF Survival Channel 146.550 FM Simplex

HAM VHF | HAM 55 | 146.5500 FM | HAM SURVIVALIST SIMPLEX*
146.55 MHz FM Simplex is the primary VHF Ham Survivalist local channel. It is one of very few ham radio 2 meter frequencies widely coordinated for FM-Simplex-only throughout USA. It is widely available to Technician basic ham license (or higher) ham operators in USA. It is popular among survivalists because it is the only coordinated 2 meter simplex channel compatible with bulletproof military surplus radios (AN/PRC-127, etc) and forest-fire radios (Bendix HTs, etc). These types of radios have 25kHz channel spacing, and are in wide use by ham radio survivalists/preppers. Useful for patrols and tactical communications. All scanners can receive this channel.

HAM VHF | HAM 52 | 146.5200 FM | HAM CALLING SIMPLEX
146.52 MHz FM Simplex is widely known as the ham radio 2 meter Calling Frequency. It is the most widely monitored simplex frequency in USA, but it should not be depended upon for emergency 911 type calls, because there are no organized first-responders on it. It is widely available to Technician basic ham license (or higher) ham operators in USA. Known by most hams as 52 Simplex, it is the channel for the Wilderness Protocol  in which hams often monitor it while in backcountry. The Long Tone Zero or LTZ protocol, applies on 52 Simplex, in which an emergency call may be transmitted at the top of the hour with the Zero key on the DTMF keypad being held down and transmitted for a long time prior to the voice call to attract attention. It is the most likely local ham radio frequency-coordinated FM Simplex channel to be activated in SHTF scenarios, especially when infrastructure and repeaters are down. All scanners can receive this channel.

HAM VHF | HAM 42 | 146.4200 FM | HAM PREPPER SIMPLEX
146.42 MHz FM Simplex is a ham radio 2 meter frequency commonly used as a chat or SHTF practice channel by mainstream Prepper organizations. It is not a normal frequency-coordinated 2 meter simplex ham channel, although it is generally within the simplex bandplan for USA. It is widely available to Technician basic ham license (or higher) ham operators in USA. Useful for practice drills, patrols, and tactical communications. All scanners can receive this channel.

Reference source: List of 2 Meter 146 MHz Simplex Reality in USA
= 146.400 Repeaters all areas
= 146.415 Simplex (or Repeaters in some areas)
= 146.430 Simplex (or Repeaters in some areas)
= 146.445 Simplex (or Repeaters in some areas)
= 146.460 Simplex all areas
= 146.475 Simplex (or Repeaters in some areas)
= 146.490 Simplex (or Repeaters in some areas)
= 146.505 Simplex (or Repeaters in some areas)
= 146.520 National Simplex Calling
= 146.535 Simplex all areas
* 146.550 Simplex all areas
= 146.565 Simplex & T-hunts (or Repeaters in some areas)
= 146.580 Simplex all areas
= 146.595 Simplex (or Repeaters in some areas)
= 146.610 Repeaters all areas

* Compatible with Mil Surplus and Forest-Fire HTs using 25 kHz channel spacing

UHF Frequencies:

GMRS | GMRS17 | 462.600 FM | SURVIVALIST CHANNEL GMRS 17 SIMPLEX
462.600 MHz FM is the GMRS Survivalist channel. It is GMRS Channel 17 in the Motorola channel naming system and GMRS Channel 3 in the Icom/GM channel naming system. This channel is popular among Survialist organizations and teams due to the the famous Survival Rule of Threes (since it is the 3rd GMRS-only channel). It is a simplex channel or a repeater output channel. If used with a repeater, the repeater input frequency is 467.600 MHz. The duplex is 5 MHz + split. PL 141.3 tone. Most scanners can receive this channel.

GMRS | GMR20R | 462.675+ FM | GMRS REPEATER PL 141.3
462.675 MHz FM is recognized as the GMRS nationwide emergency and traveler assistance repeater channel. It is GMRS Channel 20 in the Motorola channel naming system and GMRS Channel 6 in the Icom/GM channel naming system. The repeater output is 462.675 MHz and uses a 5 MHz + split with an input frequency of 467.675 MHz and a PL 141.3 tone. Most scanners can receive this channel.

FRS | FRS 3 | 462.6125 FM | PREPPER FRS CHANNEL 3
462.6125 MHz FM Simplex is FRS channel 3, it is commonly used for tactical patrols and neighborhood watch. It is an extremely short-range channel, but can be extended somewhat using GMRS radios that can also operate on this frequency or with simplex repeaters. FRS Channel 3 is on the channel list of several prepper networks. This channel is popular among Prepper organizations and teams due to the the famous Prepper Rule of Threes. Most scanners can receive this channel.

PMR | PMR 3 | 446.03125 FM | PREPPER PMR466 CHANNEL 3
446.03125 MHz FM is the Prepper channel for Personal Mobile Radio (PMR or PMR466). PMR is a low power, short range, radio system similar to FRS. It is very common in Europe, Africa, and Asia. In USA and many other places, the 446 MHz band is assigned to Amateur Radio Service (Ham) so, the PMR channels can be used by hams in those areas. PMR Channel 3 is interoperable and compatible with the HAM UHF Prepper channel HAM U3, at frequency 446.030 MHz. This channel is popular among Prepper organizations and teams in Europe due to the the famous Prepper Rule of Threes.

PMR446 Preppe Radios

PMR446 Prepper Radios

HAM UHF | HAM U3 | 446.030 FM | HAM PREPPER UHF SIMPLEX
446.030 MHz FM Simplex is a Prepper ham radio UHF frequency. Useful for practice drills, patrols, and tactical communications. It is not a normal frequency-coordinated UHF simplex ham channel, although it is a simplex frequency within the widely recognized simplex bandplan. It is interoperable and compatible with PMR Channel 3 (a channel popular among European Prepper organizations and teams) due to the the Rule of Threes. All scanners can receive this channel.

Ham HF SSB Frequencies:

HAM HF —– | HAM10M | 28.3050 USB | HAM PREPPER TECH
28.305 MHz USB is a ham radio Upper SideBand local and international frequency in the 10 meter band. In USA, it is widely available to Technician basic ham license (or higher) ham operators. This channel also is compatible with less-expensive 10-meter SSB channelized radios and extra-channel or modified CB SSB radios. HF SSB radios and military surplus manpack radios can transceive on this channel. Shortwave receivers with USB or BFO can receive this channel. Most scanners can not receive this channel due to the use of Single SideBand.

HAM HF | HAM20M | 14.2420 USB | HAM PREPPER
14.242 MHz USB is a ham radio Upper SideBand international and long distance frequency in the 20 meter band. In USA, it is only available to General license (or higher) ham operators. It is on the channel list of several organized survivalist and prepper networks, including TAPRN (The American Prepper Radio Network). HF SSB radios and military surplus manpack radios can transceive on this channel. Shortwave receivers with USB or BFO can receive this channel. Most scanners can not receive this channel due to the use of Single SideBand.

HAM HF | HAM40M | 7.2420 LSB | HAM PREPPER NETS
7.242 MHz LSB is a ham radio Lower SideBand wide area frequency in the 40 meter band available to General license (or higher) operators in USA. It is on the channel list of several organized survivalist and prepper networks, including an active practice net by TAPRN (The American Prepper Radio Network). HF SSB radios and some military surplus manpack radios can transceive on this channel. Shortwave receivers with LSB or BFO can receive this channel. Most scanners can not receive this channel due to the use of Single SideBand.

HAM HF | HAM60M | 5.3570 USB | HAM SURVIVALIST NVIS
5.357 MHz LSB is a ham radio Upper SideBand regional area frequency available to General license (or higher) operators in USA and other countries. The 5 MHz channels in the 60 meter band are recognized for use in EMCOMM Emergency Communications. This channel is optimum for long range mobile patrols and base NVIS (Near Vertical Incidence Skywave) HF communications dependably up to 500 miles on a regular daily basis. HF SSB radios and military surplus manpack radios can transceive on this channel. Shortwave receivers with USB or BFO can receive this channel. Most scanners can not receive this channel due to the use of Single SideBand.

HAM HF | HAM80M | 3.8180 LSB | HAM PREPPER NETS
3.818 MHz LSB is a ham radio Lower SideBand night regional frequency in the 80 meter band available to General license (or higher) operators in USA. It is on the channel list of several survivalist and prepper networks, including an active practice net by TAPRN (The American Prepper Radio Network). HF SSB radios and some military surplus manpack radios can transceive on this channel. Shortwave receivers with LSB or BFO can receive this channel. Most scanners can not receive this channel due to the use of Single SideBand.

CB Band and Freeband HF Frequencies:

CB AM | CB 3AM | 26.9850 AM | PREPPER CB
26.985 MHz AM is CB Channel 3. Useful for common tactical patrols and local area communications between vehicles and bases. Channel 3 CB is on the channel list of several survivalist and prepper networks. This channel is popular among Prepper organizations and teams due to the the famous Prepper Rule of Threes. Shortwave receivers can receive this channel. Some scanners can receive this channel.

CB AM | CB 9AM | 27.0650 AM | HIGHWAY SAFETY CB
27.065 MHz AM is CB Channel 9. In USA, the radio regulations designate this as the Emergency and Travelers’ Assistance Channel in FCC rules 47CFR95.407(b). It is widely used by CBers during emergencies, but it should not be considered a 911 type channel because it is not reliably monitored by any first-responder organization. Some CB radios have a dedicated Channel 9 button. Shortwave receivers can receive this channel. Some scanners can receive this channel.

CB SSB | CB 36U | 027.3650 USB | SURVIVALIST CB SSB
27.365 MHz USB is CB Channel 36 Upper SideBand. Highly useful for long range patrols and wide local area communications, espeically between vehicles and bases up to about 20 miles. Channel 36 USB CB is on the primary channel list of various survivalist groups. Shortwave receivers with USB or BFO can receive this channel. Most scanners can not receive this channel due to the use of Single SideBand.

CB FREEBAND | FB368U | 027.3680 USB | FREEBAND SURVIVALIST SSB
27.368 MHz USB is the primary Survivalist Freeband Upper SideBand channel. It is in the gap between CB channel 36 and CB channel 37. Useful for long range patrols and wide local area communications, it is especially good between vehicles and bases up to about 20 miles or more. This frequency is clearer due to less interference and has longer distance range than normal CB channels for survivalist groups using CB SSB radios with unlocked clarifier. Shortwave receivers with USB or BFO can receive this channel. Most scanners can not receive this channel due to the use of Single SideBand.

Survivalist 375 CB SSB Radio

Survivalist 375 CB SSB Radio

CB SSB | CB 37 U | 027.3750 USB | PREPPER CB SSB
27.375 MHz USB is CB Channel 36 Upper SideBand. Highly useful for long range patrols and wide local area communications, especially between vehicles and bases up to about 20 miles. Channel 37 USB CB is a prepper listed frequency. Shortwave receivers with USB or BFO can receive this channel. Most scanners can not receive this channel due to the use of Single SideBand.

CB FREEBAND | FB378U | 027.3780 USB | FREEBAND PREPPER SSB
27.378 MHz USB is the most popular Prepper Freeband Upper SideBand channel in the gap between CB channel 38 and CB channel 37. It is useful for long range patrols and wide local area communications, especially between vehicles and bases up to about 20 miles. This frequency is clearer due to less interference and has longer distance range than normal CB channels for SHTF groups using CB SSB radios with unlocked clarifier. Shortwave receivers with USB or BFO can receive this channel. Most scanners can not receive this channel due to the use of Single SideBand.

Survivalist Prepper Communications HF SSB Ham Radio Modified for CB Freeband

Survivalist Prepper Communications HF SSB Ham Radio Modified for CB Freeband

CB FREEBAND | FB425U | 027.4250 USB | FREEBAND SURVIVALIST SSB
27.425 MHz USB is a CB freeband Upper SideBand channel in extra channels, about 2 channels above normal CB channel 40. For CBs with extra channels in bands, it is channel 2 of the band just above normal CB band (usually Band E). It is useful for long range patrols and wide local area communications, especially between vehicles and bases up to about 20 miles. This frequency is clearer and has longer distance range than normal CB channels for SHTF survivalist groups using radios with extra upper high channels. Shortwave receivers with USB or BFO can receive this channel. Most scanners can not receive this channel due to the use of Single SideBand.

Notes on PL tones, Squelch, and DCS use:
The listings for FM Simplex are all carrier squelch receiver.
=
There is some advantage to transmitting a PL 151.4 to include those who may be using CTCSS.
Continuous Tone Coded Squelch System:
Interoperability with surplus military radios is desirable using Mil Tone Squelch frequency 150 Hz, compatible with PL tone and CTCSS radios using PL 151.4 Hz. This tone is also known as Motorola Code 4A or National Interagency Fire Center code NIFC 14.

P25

P25 digital radios can be used on some of the FM Simplex channels listed.
Recommended Network Access Code NAC $F7E
(Using NAC $F7E, receiver will unsquelch with any incoming NAC)

Everyone – Talk Group ID TGID $FFFF
Individual Unit ID can be anything between $000001 and $98767F
Unit ID for (All Call) everyone, Group call $FFFFFF

DCS

Digital-Coded Squelch (DCS) or Digital Private Line (DPL) or Digital Channel Guard (DCG)
Not recommended due to interoperability issues.
If used: DCS 023.


RadioMaster wishes to thank: “SHTF Team 2”, “Joe The Prepper”, “Darth_vader”, and “Mike the radio guy”, for their contribution of photos and useful information for this article.


Disclaimer: Content provided in RadioMaster Reports is included for the sole purpose of providing educational information on a passive basis. This information may be useful to the public in the event of emergencies or disaster recovery, especially when normal techniques are not an available option. Users of this educational information are solely responsible for their actions.

©2013 RadioMaster Reports



Source link

Publié le Laisser un commentaire

Survivalist: Invisible Strain sur Steam


À propos de ce jeu

Survivalist: Invisible Strain est un jeu ouvert sur la construction d’une communauté après l’effondrement de la civilisation. Vous pouvez recruter des survivants en les faisant comme vous, en vous respectant ou en vous craignant. Vous devrez les garder au chaud, les nourrir et construire une colonie pour les protéger des zombies, des pillards et de tout ce qui existe. Utilisez la furtivité, les armes ou les mots pour atteindre vos objectifs. Actuellement, il utilise un monde généré aléatoirement, avec un mode histoire à suivre plus tard.

C’est la suite de Survivalist (mais vous n’avez pas besoin de l’avoir joué pour comprendre ce qui se passe).

FONCTIONNALITÉS

Parlez à n’importe qui

Tous les personnages vivants du monde ont des noms et des traits de personnalité. Ils se souviennent de vos actions et leurs souvenirs affectent leur humeur et leur opinion sur vous. Ils ont leur propre vie: bavarder, manger, dormir, se réchauffer, travailler et se battre. Certains vous donneront des quêtes; c’est à vous de décider comment ou si vous voulez les compléter. Ils peuvent être recrutés s’ils vous aiment, vous respectent ou vous craignent suffisamment.

Combattez avec des fusils, un arc et des flèches ou des armes de mêlée

Vous pouvez cibler les jambes de vos ennemis pour les ralentir ou essayer de leur frapper la tête pour des dégâts plus importants. Vous pouvez esquiver ou bloquer dans le combat au corps à corps – et vos ennemis aussi. Différents personnages ont des compétences différentes et peuvent monter de niveau pour améliorer leurs capacités de tir à l’arc, d’armes à feu ou de corps à corps.

Utilisez la furtivité pour chasser des zombies, des lapins ou des personnes!

Vous pouvez vous faufiler sur les ennemis et les assassiner, ou simplement les assommer et voler leurs affaires. Jetez des bouteilles ou des morceaux de viande pour distraire les zombies. Portez des vêtements camouflés pour améliorer votre compétence Stealth. Les lapins et les zombies ont tous deux un odorat aigu, alors assurez-vous de vérifier la direction du vent!

Construire une base, planter des cultures, poser des pièges

Au fur et à mesure que vous recrutez des adeptes, ils auront besoin d’un endroit pour dormir, d’une source de nourriture stable et d’un feu pour se réchauffer. Abattez des arbres, extrayez des roches et cherchez d’autres ressources dans les villes abandonnées disséminées sur la carte. Installez des pièges à fosse pour que les zombies et les pillards tombent ou installez des pièges à lapins pour la nourriture. Attribuez aux membres de votre communauté différents rôles tels que Farmer, Chef, Arrow Crafter, etc. Au fil du temps, vous pouvez construire une colonie bien défendue et autonome qui produit même ses propres balles.

Personnage personnalisable, monde généré de manière procédurale

Lorsque vous démarrez un nouveau jeu, vous pouvez configurer l’apparence, les vêtements, l’équipement, les compétences et la personnalité de votre personnage. Ou appuyez simplement sur le bouton de randomisation jusqu’à ce que vous voyiez quelque chose que vous aimez. Chaque jeu aura une nouvelle carte aléatoire avec des routes, des rivières, des villes abandonnées et des colonies de survivants.

Coop en ligne

Demandez à un ami de vous joindre et de vous aider!



Source link

Publié le Laisser un commentaire

Survivalist: Invisible Strain – Easy Start Guide (Sandbox Mode)


With the game moving into Early Access, I’ve seen lots of comments about how difficult starting out in Sandbox Mode is. I thought I’d share the character settings I have found to give the easiest start, as well as offer some tips to beginners.

How to Start in Sandbox Mode

Section One: Character and World Creation

When you create a new game you are given several different tabs with a multitude of options. These are the options which in my opinion give the easiest beginning to the game.

World Tab

After you’ve fiddled with the Vital Stats and Face tabs, jump all the way to the end with the World tab.

Here you want to choose a starting season of Late Spring, or Early Summer.

And you also want to uncheck the box next to Save Tokens.

Unchecking Invisible Strain is optional, it will make the game easier, but it doesn’t really come into great effect until later on.

The reasoning:

During the Late Fall, all Winter, and Early Spring you need to worry about temperature and Hypothermia, and crops won’t grow. During the Late Summer and Early Fall you will be under a time constraint to grow enough food for Winter. That leaves the Late Spring and Early Summer, where it’s warm enough that you don’t need to worry about a sudden rain/snow storm freezing you or killing your crops, and you still have enough time to find seeds and get a garden through several harvests before Winter.

Apart from the auto save you get when you first start the game, there is no auto saving, you need to hit F9 to save manually. On top of that saving requires and consumes an item, the Crucifix Pendant. These drop fairly regularly, but when you’re still learning the ropes it’s handy not having to worry about collecting them. Unchecking this box will turn off the requirement for the Pendants, but you will still need to manually save the game.

The Invisible Strain is a hidden zombie virus which NPCs can be infected with without knowing. When the NPC dies they immediately turn into a White Strain zombie (the most difficult version). I haven’t seen this being really impactful until later on when I start forming up my own community, so it’s generally something you don’t need to worry about in the beginning, but if you turn it off it’s one less thing to think about as you’re learning.

Clothes Tab

Now, lets jump backwards to the Clothes tab. The reason you want to do the World tab first is your starting season changes how many Clothes Points you are given. If you start in Winter you’re give more so you can “buy” the warmer, more expensive clothes, etc.

The clothes you choose to start with aren’t super important since as soon as you start killing zombies you can loot and wear their clothes (gross right?). However some items of clothing are rarer than others and give slight boosts.

The two important items of clothing you should start with are: the Sunglasses (either type), and the Baseball Cap or the Cowboy Hat, or the Military Cap. These items cost 1 point each and each gives +1 to your Sight Rating.

Your Sight Rating is a hidden stat which increases how far you can see. Increasing this helps a lot when scouting since you’ll be able to see the zombies before they can see you.

The rest of the points don’t matter and can be spent on whatever you like. I usually buy that Long-Sleeved T-Shirt because it has a good gold to weight ratio.

Skills Tab

Lets move to the Skills tab now. This is the most important tab for your Easy Start.

You want two stars in Archery, one star in Hand to Hand, and preferably one star in Fitness (if you absolutely want to buy another skill, I would take from Fitness before the other two). The last point can go anywhere, though I will give a few suggestions.

Why these points?

One star Fitness: Fitness influences your Stamina level. Stamina is used for running, fighting with melee weapons and fists, and kicking off zombies when they grab you. It also increases how much you can carry.

One star Hand to Hand: Every time you swing your weapons it takes Stamina, the more damage you do with those swings the better.

Two stars Archery: Zombies are fast and they don’t have Stamina, so they will catch you if you run. The best way to deal with zombies is by hobbling them so they can’t run. You do this by attacking their legs, and the best way to do that is at range. You need one star in Archery to be able to target their legs, and the second star makes you “lock on” quicker which will be important when you’re fighting multiple zombies. Keep in mind you can’t kill a zombie by targeting their legs, your goal is just to hobble them and buy you some space.

Where to put that last point?

I usually put it in Firearms, simply because leveling Firearms is awful. But other useful places would be Stealth, this will help sneaking up on rabbits and zombies. Or Farming, the amount of food/seeds you harvest from a plant is based on the farming level of the person who planted it, higher Farming = more food.

Why Archery over Firearms?

In my opinion, guns are an absolute trap in the beginning of the game. Do not use guns. Do not choose a gun as your starting equipment. If you loot a gun at the start, put it in a car and leave it for later. Do. Not. Use. Guns. (in the beginning) for three reasons: 1) Guns are loud and Bows are quiet, and noise matters. A lot. 2) Ammo is harder to find/make/buy than arrows. 3) Firearm stars scale horribly. This is a balance issue which hopefully is addressed at some point, but in my opinion you need at least three stars for guns to not totally suck, and four stars for them to be alright. Even with two stars, they’re still significantly worse than bows. So stick with the bow.

Equipment Tab

And finally, the Equipment tab.

This is the equipment you want to match your previous choices in the Skills tab.

A Bow, 20 Arrows, and a melee weapon.

Your melee weapon can be any of the first three (you can’t afford the Machete if you take the Bow and Arrows), but I recommend the Hunting Knife.

I’d rank them as:

#1 Hunting Knife

  • Pros: Lightest melee weapon available. You can skin zombies (and people), and then throw these flesh chunks to distract other zombies (or eat them yourself, if you really want). With Flint you can start a fire. You can Assassinate targets.
  • Cons: Shorter range, lower damage.

#2 Fire Axe

  • Pros: Higher damage than the Hunting Knife, and you can chop trees for wood right from the start.
  • Cons: Heavier.

#3 Shovel

  • Pros: Higher damage than the Hunting Knife, longer range than the Fire Axe.
  • Cons: Heavier, also digging is less useful in the beginning.

Do not take the gun!

  • It’s a trap! – Admiral Ackbar Micheal Scott

Personality Tab

The choices in the Personality tab do have gameplay effects in that depending on what you choose different dialog options will be available to you. However I haven’t found them to be super critical in making the game easier or harder in general. So I’ll leave this up to you to decide.

Section Two: How to Fight the Zombie Horde

I will be trying to explain how to clear a town of zombies. Towns have the highest concentration of zombies outside of the generated Wandering Hordes, and will be something you’ll want to clear out so you can loot them. In going over how to clear a town I will also be explaining how to fight zombies and how some of their mechanics work.

Basic Mechanics: The Senses

Sight

Survivalist Invisible Strain uses a Fog of War view system where you have a visibility radius around you and your community members, and beyond that radius the world fades into fog. This is where the Sunglasses and Baseball Cap come in from the Clothing tab, they both increase this radius slightly.

Zombies and other NPCs use this same radius system. You and NPCs can see slightly further than zombies by default, but since you’ve increased your Sight thanks to your smart clothes choices you can usually see both of them before they can see you. Zombies and NPCs also have a Cone of Vision, so they can’t see behind them which allows you to sneak up and Assassinate them.

Stealth – press Ctrl to crouch and enter stealth – plays an important role in being able to successfully sneak up on a person, but even at five stars Stealth won’t allow you to crouch directly in front of them unseen. The exception to this is when you’re in cover. Crouching in a bush gives you cover and makes you harder to see, so it’s possible with a high Stealth skill, while couching in a bush, to have people walk right by you.

The raider on the right sees a zombie ahead so he stopped to watch, the zombie can’t see them so it’s not attacking. Neither of the raiders can see me because I’m in stealth and out of their cone of vision. If one were to turn around they’d see me immediately though since I’m out in the open.

Smell

Both zombies and rabbits can use your smell to detect you, depending on the direction of the wind. On the minimap, below your temperature, there’s an arrow which denote the direction the wind is blowing. If you’re approaching a zombie with the wind at your back, it will be able to smell you. This is something which needs to be taken into account when sneaking near zombies or rabbits.

However it can also be used to your advantage in luring zombies away. You can approach until it smells you and then withdraw, the zombie will wander over to where you were to investigate and you can attack it with less chance of alerting other nearby zombies.

As long as the zombie doesn’t see you, you can continue to lure it to a safer place to fight.

Humans don’t use the smell system.

Sound

Like Smell, this is another aspect of approach which you need to keep in mind, but it can also be used to your advantage.

You can make noise in a number of ways, by throwing something (a bottle, a piece of meat, etc), by using a Wind-Up Radio, by running, by fighting, by firing a gun…

When a zombie hears a noise they will wander over to investigate. Whereas when a human hears a noise usually they will stop, crouch down, and wait.

Basic Mechanics: Targeting

To target something, hold the right mouse button. This gives you several target areas depending on your skill level. To switch between them move your mouse up and down while holding RMB.

In the left picture I have zero stars in Archery. Here I have just the single target of the zombie (the torso).

In the middle picture I have one star. Now I can choose between the torso, which does medium damage; or the legs, which does almost no damage, but it hobbles the zombie so it can’t run.

The right picture shows two stars. Now I can target the head also, which does the highest damage but it also takes the longest for the reticle to lock on. When you’re targeting the head with a melee weapon, the enemy also has a higher chance to dodge your attack.

The more stars you get beyond this, the more damage you will do and the faster and more accurate your weapon will be.

In the left picture there’s also the little arrow, circled here in yellow. This means that that zombie is also in range and I can switch to it by moving the mouse to the left.

Now, Let’s Clear a Town!

I am going to be showing pictures with and without the Fog of War so I can try to show how the zombies are reacting out of view.

And keep in mind, this is still my brand new character. I don’t even have any shoes!

Step 1: Clear a “Kill Zone” outside of town

Near the outskirts of the town you want to clear an area of the surrounding zombies. This will give you a small area where you can pull the town zombies and fight them without having others hear you.

You can do this using the things I’ve talked about before, to lure a single zombie away from others and to the area you want to kill it. Depending on the concentration of zombies, this might be the hardest “pull” here. I my case there was a pack of three I tried to break up but wasn’t able to move far enough away before the first saw me, so I ended up getting a zombie chain.

Step 2: Start pulling zombies

This is what the town looks like without the Fog of War, at least what I can see. And this is my plan:

Pull #1 back to the kill zone.

#2 will likely hear #1 and move to that location to investigate.

Group #3 should hopefully stay put.

What actually happened was I tossed some rotten meat I skinned off a zombie and it attracted both #1 and #2, #2 moved into my view a second later. Both went for the meat and started “eating”.

Riding the edge of the zombie line of sight I’m able to get the interest of one, and use that to drag him back to the kill zone. When I think he’s far enough away I target the legs and shoot.

But I wasn’t far enough and #1 heard me. No problem, target the legs and hobble him too!

Notice the legs on the first zombie look different, that means it has been hobbled. The different strains take a different amount of attacks to hobble them. Green = 1, Blue = 2, etc

Once they’re both hobbled I switch to my knife to save ammo.

Here’s the updated town. Luckily group #3 has split up a little bit, now this will be easy, just pull those two lone zombies back towards the woods, which should hopefully split that cluster on the other side of the house.

I wouldn’t be able to see this with the Fog of War on, but the orange dot is another NPC. These people can be great – you can follow behind looting bodies as they mow through a town with a four star shotgun, or they can be death – as they fire off a shot from their one star pistol and draw every zombie for miles down on you two.

Pulling that lone zombie. Rinse and repeat. Shoot the legs, stab the face. The other one got alerted, no worries, one or two extras is rarely in issue once you know how to deal with them. Shoot the legs, stab the face go!

Step 3: facepalm stupid NPCs messing up my tutorial!

And this is what I’m talking about. She’ll probably be fine because they’re spread out enough, but she just pulled four zombies at once. It would have been more like 10 if I hadn’t been clearing here. Don’t. Use. Guns.

Step 3.5: Finishing up

After the NPC messed things up I reloaded and made a short video to show this all in action. But if you were to continue from there, it’s just a rinse and repeat. Pull as few zombies as you can, using your resources to break up groups and draw them back to “safe” locations where you can kill them freely.

Though as you can probably see from these pictures and the video, “safe” is rarely safe. You get stragglers sometimes and zombies don’t behave how you think they will, but as long as you keep calm and have taken some basic precautions like clearing a kill zone then you should be able to deal with them. And as you get more experience with it things become easier and easier and you’ll wonder how a town of Greens ever gave you trouble.

Section Three: Tips and Tricks

Assassinate

One of the special features of the Hunting Knife is that it can Assassinate. If you sneak up behind someone, you will get a prompt, then just mash Space bar until you slit their throat. A nice quiet melee kill.

This is especially useful when you’re trying to attack a Looter settlement and someone is wearing body armor and a helmet. Without a helmet you can usually 1-shot them in the head with about a three star Archery skill, and without body armor I think it takes at least a four star skill to 1-shot them in the chest. But if they have both armors, the only way to kill them quietly, and without starting a war, is with the Assassinate ability.

Bases

Find natural plateaus with cliffs to build your bases on. Not every map will have these, and the tops are rarely flat, but their defensive benefits far outweigh their drawbacks in my opinion.

In this particular base, those red boxes are the only place I needed to build walls, the rest was protected by natural cliffs, this means I can defend that large area with a maximum of four people.

Destroy them from the inside

This is a little trick to take over a Looter base. It requires a little luck and some work, but you can wipe out a full base within the first week if you wanted to. The key is to thin their ranks while bolstering yours.

Hunt rabbits for their chief(s), fight (and win) with Fisticuffs, talk to everyone. Once you spend a few days sucking up to them people will like you enough to abandon the camp and join you. Target the ones with the body armor and the shotguns, try to get as many of them on your side as you can. The first few will probably join willingly, but that last one will need to be threatened.

Once you have everyone you can recruit, now it’s time to pick a fight. Everyone else will already be upset with you for “stealing their people” so starting a war will be easy. Then just run. Let all your new recruits go nuts in their camp. They will die. But they will take a lot of the remaining enemy with them. Then you’re usually left to clean up the last few guys yourself with your bow.

I’ve been able to clear out a camp of 12 Looter on day 5 this way. All I had was a bow and a bullet proof vest.

Taking over

If you’re holding a Toolbox you can take over buildings as long as the former owners are dead. You can also demolish the building as long as it’s empty, this will give you half the resources that went into building it. This is really helpful when you’re first starting your base and you have a defeated Looter base nearby, demo all their buildings for some quick materials.

Farming

Farm early and often. Farming is the primary source of food in the game, you can loot some junk foods (chips and stuff), but farming is what will carry you through the winter. Hunting rabbits is fun, and is needed for quests, but they likely won’t be able to sustain you.

The amount of food/seeds you get from your crops goes up based on how many stars the farmer who planted it has. Anyone can water or harvest, it’s only the planter who matters.

One trick I use sometimes is to manually harvest all the crops, then pause all my farmers except for the highest one, and let them replant everything. That way you can have a couple of two stars watering to grind up their skill, while your crops are all four star.

Once you get a four star or above farmer then food will not be an issue again. The amount of food produced is insane for the high stars.

To get seeds, sometimes you can find them in abandoned houses, and sometimes Raiders will be carrying them. But the easiest way to get them in the beginning is just to buy them from traders or friendly communities. You don’t need too many to get going, they multiply fast.

Also keep in mind that not all crops have seeds, some crops are the seed. Cucumbers for example, you plant the whole veggie rather than a seed. So make sure your people don’t inadvertently eat all your seed crops.

Don’t rush

Take your time in the beginning. Sleep in abandoned buildings or cars, and don’t recruit anyone you don’t need to.

This is because as soon as you build something, even just placing a tent, you’ll start to get Raider bands spawning to attack you. They’ll start at the edge of the map and target your buildings specifically. They’re not too hard in the beginning, but unless you can kill a band of three hostiles then it’s probably better to wait a bit before starting a base. Use the abandoned stores and such to hold your stuff until you’re strong enough.

Similarly with recruiting people, as soon as you start recruiting people they start needing things! “Oh whaa there’s no Outhouse, oh boohoo there’s no food, you’re the worst leader ever.” Then they get all moody and stop working. Recruiting people early on is often more bother than it’s worth IMO.



Source link

Publié le Laisser un commentaire

Accueil – Adventure Survivalist



équipement; des couteaux; camouflage; nettoyant pour armes à feu; art du métal. art du métal; collections; Blog; Nous contacter; mettre l’Amérique en premier. Achetez maintenant. kit complet de pistolet ar-15 avec canon de 7,5 ”300 blackout 409,99 $ – 429,99 $. Sélectionnez les options . kit pistolet ar-15 complet avec 80% de …



Source link

Publié le Laisser un commentaire

Survivalist: invasion PRO (2 fois moins cher)


Dans cette version, le magasin est 2 fois moins cher!
Le héros légendaire est parti pour la tâche suivante – mais cette fois, il ne pourra pas gagner sans votre aide! Ce n’est qu’ensemble que vous pouvez percer tous les secrets de l’archipel perdu dans l’océan et sauver notre monde de la menace mortelle.

Survivalist: invasion est un nouveau jeu de survie passionnant avec des éléments RPG avancés. Retrouvez-vous sur des îles tropicales «paradisiaques», où de puissantes sociétés secrètes et des organisations terroristes mènent des expériences qui peuvent changer radicalement l’histoire de l’humanité. Mettez-vous sur leur chemin avec un agent spécial, connu sous le nom d’INCONNU, et arrêtez la catastrophe mondiale imminente!

Survivalist: l’invasion repose sur des mécanismes classiques et séculaires des jeux de survie. Ici, vous devrez explorer le territoire, rechercher des ressources, fabriquer des armes et de l’équipement, construire et renforcer la base, vous engager dans des combats intenses avec divers ennemis – des zombies traditionnels aux boss mutants uniques possédant des super pouvoirs. Votre survie est entre vos mains.

Le jeu propose également des composants RPG élaborés et un scénario fascinant. Améliorez votre armure et vos armes. Rencontrez des personnages uniques et terminez leurs quêtes. Participez à la confrontation de plusieurs factions puissantes. Soyez prêt pour un long voyage plein de dangers, d’énigmes et de découvertes terrifiantes. Cet archipel est l’endroit le plus mystérieux de la planète. Un grand nombre de personnes, des scientifiques aux agences de renseignement américaines, ont tenté de maîtriser les forces qui se cachaient dans ses profondeurs. Et seule la Global Revolution Army, reconnue comme organisation terroriste dans la plupart des pays du monde, a réussi. Mais l’ont-ils fait? Ou est-ce beaucoup plus compliqué qu’il n’y paraît à première vue?

Vous devez le découvrir. Et la seule aide dans un défi aussi difficile sera UNKnown, un agent secret, un ancien commando, un maître des arts martiaux. Écoutez ses conseils, mais prenez vos propres décisions – et apprenez les dures lois de la survie sur les îles de Survivalist: invasion PRO!



Source link

Publié le Laisser un commentaire

Survivalist SSB CB Freeband Channel Frequency List


Information for Survivalist, Prepper, or SHTF Survival Communications using Single SideBand CB radio around 27 MHz.
Survivalist 375 CB SSB Radio
The original source of this article is the RadioMaster Reports blog.

Freeband
Freeband frequencies around 27 MHz CB have been widely used by thousands and thousands of freebanders worldwide over the past 40+ years. Here in this list, we document the best and most common Single SideBand (SSB, USB, LSB) Freeband frequencies useful for Survivalists. We cover mainly SSB because it is by far the best method. SSB is so much better than either AM or FM, that it should be the the prime choice of survivalists and SHTF preppers everywhere, for direct communication over wide areas between mobiles and base stations.

Extra Super Secret Channels
The Survivalist SSB CB Freeband Channel Frequency List is the essential chart of Secret CB channels, CB SSB channels, …

©2013 RadioMaster Reports

…enter the zone of Freeband Frequencies, Splinter Channels, Drop Channels, Hidden Channels, Gap Channels, Upper Channels, High Channels, Extra Channels, and Zero Channels, Hidden Frequencies, Private Channels, Secret Channels, Stealth Frequency.

About Freeband
Freeband refers to unlicensed transmitting on the frequencies above, below, and in between normal HF radio bands. Freebanding is communicating on the freeband frequencies. CB radios and HAM radios can be modified to get freeband channels.

Survivalist Channel – Prepper Channel
CB, Freeband, and Ham 10 meter Band: Calling Channels


========= ============== ======= ====== ======================
CHAN TYPE| CHANNEL NAME | FREQ. | MODE | COMMON CHANNEL USAGE
========= ============== ======= ====== ======================
NORMAL CB| CHANNEL ===3 | 26.985 AM == PREPPER CH 3 AM
NORMAL CB| CHANNEL ==37 | 27.375 USB = PREPPER SURVIVALIST
FREEBAND | CHANNEL ==42 | 27.425 USB = PREPPER SURVIVALIST
HAM BAND | HAM ==28.305 | 28.305 USB = HAM PREPPER SURVIVALIST

Survivalist Prepper Channel | CB SSB Freeband

AM Amplitude Modulation
AM is the basic modulation mode in standard CB radios. It is good for short range communication with common CB radios and CB HT (handheld) radios or walkie talkies. Some CB radios also have Single Sideband (SSB). AM is prone to more interference and doesn’t go as far as SSB.

Single Sideband CB Radio USB Upper Sideband

Single Sideband CB Radio USB Upper Sideband


Video: Typical Vehicle Mobile SSB CB Radio Long Distance Communications

Upper SideBand (USB) or Lower SideBand (LSB)
Single SideBand (SSB) CB radios are very popular for freeband. SSB is by far the best freeband mode. LSB is mostly used for local area and “skip talking” in English language in North America. USB is used often for long distance, International communications, or Spanish language in North or South America. The choice of which sideband to use is not etched in stone. USB is usually selected for prepper and SHTF Survival channels because it is clearer and more compatible with various types of radios.

Single Sideband CB Radio Clarifier

Single Sideband CB Radio Clarifier

Freeband Radios
Freebanders use one of the following types of radios to talk on these channels:

1. CB radio modified with “extra channels”, “high channels”, “expanded”, or “unlocked clarifier”.
2. Ham “10 meter” SSB radio that has been modified for 11 meters.
3. Export CB SSB radio, often with Band switch ABCDE or ABCDEFG.
4. Ham HF SSB radio modified for general coverage transmit.
5. Commercial land mobile HF SSB radio.
6. Marine HF SSB radio.
7. Military surplus HF SSB radio or manpack.
8. Aeronautical HF SSB radio.

Video: Some Night Activity on Survivalist Prepper Freeband Channel 27.425 kHz SSB


Video: Activity on Survivalist Prepper Freeband Channel 27.425 kHz SSB

Freeband Radio License
“License? Freebanders don’t need no stinkin’ license!” Freebanders don’t have a license for these frequencies. CB radio rules, channels, modes, and frequency bands vary quite a lot from country to country.  99.99% of the time, the governments don’t enforce radio rules or regulations on the common freeband frequencies unless someone uses a high power linear amplifier to create radio interference for neighborhood TV sets or other services. Enforcement pretty much gave up on this part of the spectrum a long time ago, and it is mostly considered “sacrificial spectrum” in the “wild west of radio”. However, there are some frequencies in this spectrum that wise freebanders avoid. For example, between 28.000 MHz and 29.700 MHz, the 10 meter ham band, they are very likely to be tracked by ham operators and reported to the authorities. In USA, many CB truck drivers don’t heed freebander frequency caution; they often talk on 28.085 MHz (sometimes known as “high 19”) where they are easily tracked down by hams. Their trucking companies are often fined by FCC, and the drivers get fired. Most freeband operators look down upon that kind of carelessness.


Video: Typical Long Distance Vehicle Mobile Communications using SSB CB
Why Freeband
So, with all the issues surrounding it, why do people use freeband? Simple. It works. The frequencies are clear; free of the busy chatter and interference of normal CB channels. Freeband goes further than other common unlicensed radios like FRS, GMRS, or MURS. Freeband distance range is similar to ham radio 10 meter HF SSB. Freeband is compatible with the CB radios. The radios are widely available, inexpensive, ubiquitous, and easy to use.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MEsPXkMA1hY
Video: Typical Long Distance Communications using SSB CB Freeband

Freeband Operating Methods
Freebanders usually use fake callsign numbers or letters to anonymize themselves. These are different callsigns than the ones they use on Normal CB Channels. If talking about locations they are usually vague or use informal code words known only to each other. Freeband users often are normal CB users who just want some of the long distance communication advantages of ham radio HF SSB, but without a license. Freebanders go in between or outside the normal CB channels to achieve long distance communication that would be nearly impossible on the normal 40 CB channels. Radios with expanded channels, Export CB Bands or a VFO feature with frequency display, can transmit above the CB band. Even a very old used SSB CB modified with expanded clarifier slider can tune slightly off frequency to the Drop Gap (LSB) or High Gap (USB) clear space between channels. To avoid detection, freebanders often transmit from vehicles instead of base stations. Long distance can be achieved by parking away from power lines on an isolated hilltop, side road, or open parking lot. By limiting conversations on the freeband channels to only what is necessary and avoiding long-winded chat or skip-talking, the detection footprint is minimized. Freebander groups usually have one or two frequencies they use as a “call channel” for initially making contact, and then select another frequency at random for continued conversation. They usually avoid talking about specific activities or using coarse language that might make them stand out. Instead, they try to blend in casually.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SEYZYPyJOlA;
Video: Typical CB SSB Solid Local Communications Using Whip Antenna on a Pickup Truck
Freeband Radios for SHTF
Freeband-capable CB radios are well-suited to SHTF survivalist situations. The direct radio-to-radio distance range of freeband CB SSB is much greater than a ham VHF/UHF HT or MURS or FRS or GMRS. This is because 27MHz travels further than line-of-sight, due to ground wave that can extend the range over hills and valleys. A big advantage is that inconspicuous CB SSB radios modified for freeband look exactly like normal CB radios. With a good antenna, these radios can usually cover a wide range around a local town or county area. The radios run on 12 Volt DC, can be powered for many days on a car battery, and then recharged with solar or alternative energy. The addition of high power linear amplifiers to CB SSB can greatly extend the groundwave range. Military surplus manpack HF SSB radios can be used for freeband. Marine HF SSB radios can be modified for freeband, and some Aeronautical HF radios can work on freeband. Keep in mind that many of these radios are only capable of Upper SideBand, so USB is usually selected for SHTF survival HF freeband frequencies.


Video: Unlocking Clarifier and Extra Channels on Uniden Bearcat 980 SSB CB


Video: Unlocked Clarifier and Extra Channels on Cobra 148 GTL SSB CB

CB SSB Clarifer Unlock Modification

Typical CB SSB Clarifer Unlock Modification Schematic


Video: Typical Ham Radio HF SSB Modified for Freeband SSB
Ham Radio 10 Meter Band SSB
Some freeband operators are also ham operators. And some ham operators are also freeband operators. But, a lot of so-called export radios that are made for the 10 meter ham band are utilized on freeband. Keep in mind that there is a ham radio Survivalist-Prepper channel SSB frequency in the 10 meter band. It is available and legal for Technician class operators.
HAM LICENSE ONLY:
========= THE 10 METER HAM BAND= ====== ====== ===============
HAM BAND AMATEUR 10 METER 28.000 TO 29.700 BAND F/G
HAM BAND | 28.305 = USB | 28.305 USB*HAM PREPPER TECH SSB*
========= ============== ======= ====== ======================
* SURVIVALIST/PREPPER CHANNELS

Historic Background of Freeband SSB Survivalist activity.

1971-1976. It was very common to use splinter gap channels with expanded unlocked clarifiers on 23 channel CBs. Survivalist freeband SSBers were found on 27168 USB (just above normal CB channel 16). Frequency modifications for use outside the normal CB band required the use of an external VFO or slider, or else the internal modification with a switch and quartz crystals.

In 1977, the new 40 channel digitally tuned PLL phase-locked-loop radios started to flood the CB market. CB SSB radios could be bought for under $100. Many SSB survivalists tended to call on normal CB channel 37 USB (27375 kHz) and then slid up with unlocked clarifiers or sliders to 27378 USB or down to 27368 to get away from AM interference.

Freeband Upper SideBand (USB) Gap Frequencies Between Normal CB Channels

By late 1977, as the new 40 channels became crowded, most began expanding the PLL channel selectors on their radios for the non-official channels above 40, which became known as The Uppers. Freeband PLL modification of those 40 channel CBs was easy: cut some PC board traces and solder wires to add-on toggle switches; re-purpose the noise blanker or PA switch. A lot of the freebander SSBers abandoned their old unlocked clarifier/slider splinter channels for the greener pastures of The Uppers.

By 1978, the freeband 27425 kHz frequency was called Channel 42. These days it is known as Upper 2, or E2, or Hi 425. It was very active with a large number of independent-minded back-to-the-land folks. 27425 USB became a watering hole for backwoods hippies and non-conformist survivalists, way before anyone ever heard of the word “prepper”. Most used 3 digit or 4 digit callsigns, and/or very common names such as John, Mike, Bill, Bob, Mary, etc. [not their real names]. Folks seemed to get along OK on 27425 USB with each other, often talking about hunting, food, bushcraft, vehicles, solar power, cabins, windmills, horses, snares, guns, knives, camping, and modifying radios. There were around 150 to 200 active operators on this channel who mostly knew each other via skip or groundwave. Occasionally, political discussions led to drunken rants or verbal combat 🙂 But, most were friendly, intelligent folks when they weren’t operating-while-inebriated. 27425 USB continued to be a very active survivalist channel throughout the 1980s.

By the early 1990s, only a small number of the old timer freeband survivalists were still on the air. By the late 1990s it seemed like everyone drifted away from CB/freeband and found the internet.

Fast forward to 2001-2015. A rebirth of survivalism and the growing popularity of prepping led to a resurgence of interest in emergency survivalist communications.

In 2011 the old RadioMaster logbook of channel lists was dusted off and transferred to spreadsheets. These lists were passed around by email among old friends and posted on a few CB and prepper forums.

In 2013, it seemed like the interest in survivalist comms had increased enough to do a series of articles specifically on the subject.


Video: Typical CB Installation with Linear Amplifier
Freeband Radios Channel Charts

Here are some freeband frequency channel charts for various types of radios.

==============================================================
Channel List Prepper Survivalist AM SSB CB Freeband
========= ============== ======= ====== ======================
CHAN TYPE| CHANNEL NAME | FREQ. | MODE | COMMON CHANNEL USAGE
========= ============== ======= ====== ======================
FREEBAND | DROP GAP ==1 | 26.962 LSB
NORMAL CB| CHANNEL ===1 | 26.965 AM
FREEBAND | HIGH GAP ==1 | 26.968 USB
FREEBAND | GAP =====1/2 | 26.970 LSB/USB
FREEBAND | DROP GAP ==2 | 26.972 LSB
NORMAL CB| CHANNEL ===2 | 26.975 AM
FREEBAND | HIGH GAP ==2 | 26.978 USB
FREEBAND | GAP =====2/3 | 26.980 LSB/USB
FREEBAND | DROP GAP ==3 | 26.982 LSB
NORMAL CB| CHANNEL ===3 | 26.985 AM *CB PREPPER CH 3 AM*
FREEBAND | HIGH GAP ==3 | 26.988 USB
FREEBAND | GAP ====3/3A | 26.990 LSB/USB
FREEBAND | DROP GAP =3A | 26.992 LSB
CONTROL= | CHANNEL ==3A | 26.995 REMOTE CONTROL TOYS/ALARMS
FREEBAND | HIGH GAP =3A | 26.998 USB
FREEBAND | GAP ====3A/4 | 27.000 LSB/USB
FREEBAND | DROP GAP ==4 | 27.002 LSB
NORMAL CB| CHANNEL ===4 | 27.005 AM CB 4X4 4WD JEEP CLUBS
FREEBAND | HIGH GAP ==4 | 27.008 USB
FREEBAND | GAP =====4/5 | 27.010 LSB/USB
FREEBAND | DROP GAP ==5 | 27.012 LSB
NORMAL CB| CHANNEL ===5 | 27.015 AM
FREEBAND | HIGH GAP ==5 | 27.018 USB
FREEBAND | GAP =====5/6 | 27.020 LSB/USB
FREEBAND | DROP GAP ==6 | 27.022 LSB
NORMAL CB| CHANNEL ===6 | 27.025 AM SKIP TALKER HIGH POWER CB
FREEBAND | HIGH GAP ==6 | 27.028 USB
FREEBAND | GAP =====6/7 | 27.030 LSB/USB
FREEBAND | DROP GAP ==7 | 27.032 LSB
NORMAL CB| CHANNEL ===7 | 27.035 AM
FREEBAND | HIGH GAP ==7 | 27.038 USB
FREEBAND | GAP ====7/7A | 27.040 LSB/USB
FREEBAND | DROP GAP =7A | 27.042 LSB
CONTROL= | CHANNEL ==7A | 27.045 REMOTE CONTROL TOYS/ALARMS
FREEBAND | HIGH GAP =7A | 27.048 USB
FREEBAND | GAP ====7A/8 | 27.050 LSB/USB
FREEBAND | DROP GAP ==8 | 27.052 LSB
NORMAL CB| CHANNEL ===8 | 27.055 AM
FREEBAND | HIGH GAP ==8 | 27.058 USB
FREEBAND | GAP =====8/9 | 27.060 LSB/USB
FREEBAND | DROP GAP ==9 | 27.062 LSB
NORMAL CB| CHANNEL ===9 | 27.065 AM EMERGENCY CB AM
FREEBAND | HIGH GAP ==9 | 27.068 USB
FREEBAND | GAP ====9/10 | 27.070 LSB/USB
========= ============== ======= ====== ======================
CHAN TYPE| CHANNEL NAME | FREQ. | MODE | COMMON CHANNEL USAGE
========= ============== ======= ====== ======================
FREEBAND | DROP GAP =10 | 27.072 LSB
NORMAL CB| CHANNEL ==10 | 27.075 AM
FREEBAND | HIGH GAP =10 | 27.078 USB
FREEBAND | GAP ===10/11 | 27.080 LSB/USB
FREEBAND | DROP GAP =11 | 27.082 LSB
NORMAL CB| CHANNEL ==11 | 27.085 AM LOCAL CB CALLING
FREEBAND | HIGH GAP =11 | 27.088 USB
FREEBAND | GAP ==11/11A | 27.090 LSB/USB
FREEBAND | DROP GAP 11A | 27.092 LSB
CONTROL= | CHANNEL =11A | 27.095 REMOTE CONTROL TOYS/ALARMS
FREEBAND | HIGH GAP 11A | 27.098 USB
FREEBAND | GAP ==11A/12 | 27.100 LSB/USB
FREEBAND | DROP GAP 12A | 27.102 LSB
NORMAL CB| CHANNEL ==12 | 27.105 AM
FREEBAND | HIGH GAP =12 | 27.108 USB
FREEBAND | GAP ===12/13 | 27.110 LSB/USB
FREEBAND | DROP GAP =13 | 27.112 LSB
NORMAL CB| CHANNEL ==13 | 27.115 AM RV OR CAMPERS CB
FREEBAND | HIGH GAP =13 | 27.118 USB
FREEBAND | GAP ===13/14 | 27.120 LSB/USB
FREEBAND | DROP GAP =14 | 27.122 LSB
NORMAL CB| CHANNEL ==14 | 27.125 AM CB WALKIE=TALKIES
FREEBAND | HIGH GAP =14 | 27.128 USB
FREEBAND | GAP ===14/15 | 27.130 LSB/USB
FREEBAND | DROP GAP =15 | 27.132 LSB
NORMAL CB| CHANNEL ==15 | 27.135 AM
FREEBAND | HIGH GAP =15 | 27.138 USB
FREEBAND | GAP ==15/15A | 27.140 LSB/USB
FREEBAND | DROP GAP 15A | 27.142 LSB
CONTROL= | CHANNEL =15A | 27.155 REMOTE CONTROL TOYS/ALARMS
FREEBAND | HIGH GAP 15A | 27.148 USB
FREEBAND | GAP ==15A/16 | 27.150 LSB/USB
FREEBAND | DROP GAP =16 | 27.152 LSB
NORMAL CB| CHANNEL ==16 | 27.155 AM CB 4X4 4WD JEEP CLUBS
FREEBAND | HIGH GAP =16 | 27.158 USB
FREEBAND | GAP ===16/17 | 27.160 LSB/USB
FREEBAND | DROP GAP =17 | 27.162 LSB
NORMAL CB| CHANNEL ==17 | 27.165 AM CB HIGHWAY TRUCKERS
FREEBAND | HIGH GAP =17 | 27.168 USB
FREEBAND | GAP ===17/18 | 27.170 LSB/USB
FREEBAND | DROP GAP =18 | 27.172 LSB
NORMAL CB| CHANNEL ==18 | 27.175 AM
FREEBAND | HIGH GAP =18 | 27.178 USB
FREEBAND | GAP ===18/19 | 27.180 LSB/USB
FREEBAND | DROP GAP =19 | 27.182 LSB
NORMAL CB| CHANNEL ==19 | 27.185 AM CB HIGHWAY TRUCKER PRIMARY
FREEBAND | HIGH GAP =19 | 27.188 USB
FREEBAND | GAP ==19/19A | 27.190 LSB/USB
FREEBAND | DROP GAP 19A | 27.192 LSB
CONTROL= | CHANNEL =19A | 27.195 REMOTE CONTROL TOYS/ALARMS
FREEBAND | HIGH GAP 19A | 27.198 USB
FREEBAND | GAP ==19A/20 | 27.200 LSB/USB
========= ============== ======= ====== ======================
CHAN TYPE| CHANNEL NAME | FREQ. | MODE | COMMON CHANNEL USAGE
========= ============== ======= ====== ======================
FREEBAND | DROP GAP =20 | 27.202 LSB
NORMAL CB| CHANNEL ==20 | 27.205 AM
FREEBAND | HIGH GAP =20 | 27.208 USB
FREEBAND | GAP ===20/21 | 27.210 LSB/USB
FREEBAND | DROP GAP =21 | 27.212 LSB
NORMAL CB| CHANNEL ==21 | 27.215 AM CB HIGHWAY TRUCKERS
FREEBAND | HIGH GAP =21 | 27.218 USB
FREEBAND | GAP ===21/22 | 27.220 LSB/USB
FREEBAND | DROP GAP =22 | 27.222 LSB
NORMAL CB| CHANNEL ==22 | 27.225 AM
FREEBAND | HIGH GAP =22 | 27.228 USB
FREEBAND | GAP ===22/24 | 27.230 LSB/USB
FREEBAND | DROP GAP =24 | 27.232 LSB
NORMAL CB| CHANNEL ==24 | 27.235 AM
FREEBAND | HIGH GAP =24 | 27.238 USB
FREEBAND | GAP ===24/25 | 27.240 LSB/USB
FREEBAND | DROP GAP =25 | 27.242 LSB
NORMAL CB| CHANNEL ==25 | 27.245 AM
FREEBAND | HIGH GAP =25 | 27.248 USB
FREEBAND | GAP ===25/23 | 27.250 LSB/USB
FREEBAND | DROP GAP =23 | 27.252 LSB
NORMAL CB| CHANNEL ==23 | 27.255 AM
FREEBAND | HIGH GAP =23 | 27.258 USB
FREEBAND | GAP ===23/26 | 27.260 LSB/USB
FREEBAND | DROP GAP =26 | 27.262 LSB
NORMAL CB| CHANNEL ==26 | 27.265 AM
FREEBAND | HIGH GAP =26 | 27.268 USB
FREEBAND | GAP ===26/27 | 27.270 LSB/USB
FREEBAND | DROP GAP =27 | 27.272 LSB
NORMAL CB| CHANNEL ==27 | 27.275 AM
FREEBAND | HIGH GAP =27 | 27.278 USB
FREEBAND | GAP ===27/28 | 27.280 LSB/USB
FREEBAND | DROP GAP =28 | 27.282 LSB
NORMAL CB| CHANNEL ==28 | 27.285 AM
FREEBAND | HIGH GAP =28 | 27.288 USB
FREEBAND | GAP ===28/29 | 27.290 LSB/USB
FREEBAND | DROP GAP =29 | 27.292 LSB
NORMAL CB| CHANNEL ==29 | 27.295 AM
FREEBAND | HIGH GAP =29 | 27.298 USB
FREEBAND | GAP ===29/30 | 27.300 LSB/USB
========= ============== ======= ====== ======================
CHAN TYPE| CHANNEL NAME | FREQ. | MODE | COMMON CHANNEL USAGE
========= ============== ======= ====== ======================
FREEBAND | DROP GAP =30 | 27.302 LSB
NORMAL CB| CHANNEL ==30 | 27.305 AM/LSB/USB
FREEBAND | HIGH GAP =30 | 27.308 USB
FREEBAND | GAP ===30/31 | 27.310 LSB/USB
FREEBAND | DROP GAP =31 | 27.312 LSB
NORMAL CB| CHANNEL ==31 | 27.315 AM/LSB/USB
FREEBAND | HIGH GAP =31 | 27.318 USB
FREEBAND | GAP ===31/32 | 27.310 LSB/USB
FREEBAND | DROP GAP =32 | 27.322 LSB
NORMAL CB| CHANNEL ==32 | 27.325 AM/LSB/USB
FREEBAND | HIGH GAP =32 | 27.328 USB
FREEBAND | GAP ===32/33 | 27.330 LSB/USB
FREEBAND | DROP GAP =33 | 27.332 LSB
NORMAL CB| CHANNEL ==33 | 27.335 AM/LSB/USB
FREEBAND | HIGH GAP =33 | 27.338 USB
FREEBAND | GAP ===33/34 | 27.340 LSB/USB
FREEBAND | DROP GAP =34 | 27.342 LSB
NORMAL CB| CHANNEL ==34 | 27.345 AM/LSB/USB
FREEBAND | HIGH GAP =34 | 27.348 USB
FREEBAND | GAP ===34/35 | 27.350 LSB/USB
FREEBAND | DROP GAP =35 | 27.352 LSB
NORMAL CB| CHANNEL ==35 | 27.355 LSB/USB
FREEBAND | HIGH GAP =35 | 27.358 USB
FREEBAND | GAP ===35/36 | 27.360 LSB/USB
FREEBAND | DROP GAP =36 | 27.362 LSB
NORMAL CB| CHANNEL ==36 | 27.365 USB
FREEBAND | HIGH GAP =36 | 27.368 USB [OBSOLETE SURVIVALIST]
FREEBAND | GAP ===36/37 | 27.370 LSB/USB [SOME PREPPERS]
FREEBAND | DROP GAP =37 | 27.372 LSB
NORMAL CB| CHANNEL ==37 | 27.375 USB PREPPER SURVIVALIST SSB*
FREEBAND | HIGH GAP =37 | 27.378 USB [OBSOLETE PREPPER]
FREEBAND | GAP ===37/38 | 27.380 LSB/USB
FREEBAND | DROP GAP =38 | 27.382 LSB
NORMAL CB| CHANNEL ==38 | 27.385 LSB/USB MAIN CB LSB CALLING
FREEBAND | HIGH GAP =38 | 27.388 USB
FREEBAND | GAP ===38/39 | 27.390 USB [SOME PREPPERS]
FREEBAND | DROP GAP =39 | 27.392 LSB
NORMAL CB| CHANNEL ==39 | 27.395 LSB/USB
FREEBAND | HIGH GAP =39 | 27.398 USB
FREEBAND | GAP ===39/40 | 27.400 LSB/USB
FREEBAND | DROP GAP =40 | 27.402 LSB
NORMAL CB| CHANNEL ==40 | 27.405 AM/LSB/USB
========= ============== ======= ====== ======================
========= THE UPPERS==== ======= ====== === HIGH BAND E ======
========= ============== ======= ====== ======================
CHAN TYPE| CHANNEL NAME | FREQ. | MODE | COMMON CHANNEL USAGE
========= ============== ======= ====== ======================
FREEBAND | ==== 41 ZERO | 27.410 LSB/USB
FREEBAND | CHANNEL ==41 | 27.415 LSB/USB BAND=E CHAN 1
FREEBAND | ==== 42 ZERO | 27.420 LSB/USB
FREEBAND | CHANNEL ==42 | 27.425 USB SURVIVALIST PREPPER “E2”
FREEBAND | ==== 43 ZERO | 27.430 LSB/USB
FREEBAND | CHANNEL ==43 | 27.435 LSB/USB BAND=E CHAN=3
FREEBAND | ==== 44 ZERO | 27.440 LSB/USB
FREEBAND | CHANNEL ==44 | 27.445 LSB/USB BAND=E CHAN=3A
FREEBAND | ==== 45 ZERO | 27.450 LSB/USB
FREEBAND | CHANNEL ==45 | 27.455 LSB/USB BAND=E CHAN=4
FREEBAND | ==== 46 ZERO | 27.460 LSB/USB
FREEBAND | CHANNEL ==46 | 27.465 LSB/USB BAND=E CHAN=5
FREEBAND | ==== 47 ZERO | 27.470 LSB/USB
FREEBAND | CHANNEL ==47 | 27.475 LSB/USB BAND=E CHAN=6
FREEBAND | ==== 48 ZERO | 27.480 LSB/USB
FREEBAND | CHANNEL ==48 | 27.485 LSB/USB BAND=E CHAN=7
FREEBAND | ==== 49 ZERO | 27.490 LSB/USB
FREEBAND | CHANNEL ==49 | 27.495 LSB/USB BAND=E CHAN=7A
FREEBAND | ==== 50 ZERO | 27.500 LSB/USB
FREEBAND | CHANNEL ==50 | 27.505 LSB/USB BAND=E CHAN=8
========= ============== ======= ====== ======================
========= THE UPPERS==== ======= ====== ======================
========= ============== ======= ====== ======================
CHAN TYPE| CHANNEL NAME | FREQ. | MODE | COMMON CHANNEL USAGE
========= ============== ======= ====== ======================
FREEBAND | ==== 51 ZERO | 27.510 LSB/USB
FREEBAND | CHANNEL ==51 | 27.515 LSB/USB BAND=E CHAN=9
FREEBAND | ==== 52 ZERO | 27.520 LSB/USB
FREEBAND | CHANNEL ==51 | 27.515 LSB/USB BAND=E CHAN=10
FREEBAND | ==== 53 ZERO | 27.530 LSB/USB
FREEBAND | CHANNEL ==53 | 27.535 LSB/USB BAND=E CHAN=11
FREEBAND | ==== 54 ZERO | 27.540 LSB/USB
FREEBAND | CHANNEL ==54 | 27.545 LSB/USB BAND=E CHAN=11A
FREEBAND | ==== 55 ZERO | 27.550 LSB/USB
FREEBAND | CHANNEL ==55 | 27.555 LSB/USB E12 FREEBAND CALLING
FREEBAND | ==== 56 ZERO | 27.560 LSB/USB
FREEBAND | CHANNEL ==56 | 27.565 LSB/USB BAND=E CHAN=13
FREEBAND | ==== 57 ZERO | 27.570 LSB/USB
FREEBAND | CHANNEL ==57 | 27.575 LSB/USB E14 =NOT RECOMMENDED
FREEBAND | ==== 58 ZERO | 27.580 LSB/USB =====NOT RECOMMENDED!
FREEBAND | CHANNEL ==58 | 27.585 LSB/USB E15 =NOT RECOMMENDED!
FREEBAND | ==== 59 ZERO | 27.590 LSB/USB =====NOT RECOMMENDED!
FREEBAND | CHANNEL ==59 | 27.595 LSB/USB E15A NOT RECOMMENDED
FREEBAND | ==== 60 ZERO | 27.600 LSB/USB
FREEBAND | CHANNEL ==60 | 27.605 AM/LSB/USB BAND=E CHAN=16
FREEBAND | ABOVE CH==61 | 27.610 TO 27.999 E17 NOT RECOMMENDED
========= ============== ======= ====== ======================

Ranger_6300_6900_Channel_Frequency

Galaxy_2100_FrequencyChart

Modified_Export_CB_Radio_Channel_Frequency

Export_CB_Radio_Channel_Frequency

Connex_CX_4800_Channel_Frequency

CB 27 MHz Frequency Channel Chart for 6-Band Export Radios

 

Channel A B C D E F
1 25.615 26.065 26.515 26.965 27.415 27.865
2 25.625 26.075 26.525 26.975 27.425 27.875
3 25.635 26.085 26.535 26.985 27.435 27.885
4 25.655 26.105 26.555 27.005 27.455 27.905
5 25.665 26.115 26.565 27.015 27.465 27.915
6 25.675 26.125 26.575 27.025 27.475 27.925
7 25.685 26.135 26.585 27.035 27.485 27.935
8 25.705 26.155 26.605 27.055 27.505 27.955
9 25.715 26.165 26.615 27.065 27.515 27.965
10 25.725 26.175 26.625 27.075 27.525 27.975
11 25.735 26.185 26.635 27.085 27.535 27.985
12 25.755 26.205 26.655 27.105 27.555 28.005
13 25.765 26.215 26.665 27.115 27.565 28.015
14 25.775 26.225 26.675 27.125 27.575 28.025
15 25.785 26.235 26.685 27.135 27.585 28.035
16 25.805 26.255 26.705 27.155 27.605 28.055
17 25.815 26.265 26.715 27.165 27.615 28.065
18 25.825 26.275 26.725 27.175 27.625 28.075
19 25.835 26.285 26.735 27.185 27.635 28.085
Channel A B C D E F
20 25.855 26.305 26.755 27.205 27.655 28.105
21 25.865 26.315 26.765 27.215 27.665 28.115
22 25.875 26.325 26.775 27.225 27.675 28.125
23 25.905 26.355 26.805 27.255 27.705 28.155
24 25.885 26.335 26.785 27.235 27.685 28.135
25 25.895 26.345 26.795 27.245 27.695 28.145
26 25.915 26.365 26.815 27.265 27.715 28.165
27 25.925 26.375 26.825 27.275 27.725 28.175
28 25.935 26.385 26.835 27.285 27.735 28.185
29 25.945 26.395 26.845 27.295 27.745 28.195
30 25.955 26.405 26.855 27.305 27.755 28.205
31 25.965 26.415 26.865 27.315 27.765 28.215
32 25.975 26.425 26.875 27.325 27.775 28.225
33 25.985 26.435 26.885 27.335 27.785 28.235
34 25.995 26.445 26.895 27.345 27.795 28.245
35 26.005 26.455 26.905 27.355 27.805 28.255
36 26.015 26.465 26.915 27.365 27.815 28.265
37 26.025 26.475 26.925 27.375 27.825 28.275
38 26.035 26.485 26.935 27.385 27.835 28.285
39 26.045 26.495 26.945 27.395 27.845 28.295
40 26.055 26.505 26.955 27.405 27.855 28.305

 

Some possible freeband radios which have ‘extra channels’ in the 11 meter band 27 MHz.

AM/SSB or AM or AM/FM or AM/FM/SSB

ALBRECHT – model: AE-497

COBRA – model: 200 GTL DX

CONNEX – models: 3300, 3300 HP, 3300HP-ZX, 3300 PLUS, CX-3800, 4300 HP, 4300 HP 300, 4400, 4400 HP, 4600, Turbo, 4800 DXL, 4800 HPE, Deer Hunter, General Lee, General Washington, Saturn, CX 33TLM

DRAGON – model: SS-497

EAGLE – models: 2000, Saturn, 5000

GALAXY – models: 33HML, 44V, 45MP, 47, 48T, 55, 55V, 66V, 73V, 77, 77HML, 88HL, 93T, 94, 95T, 98, 99V, 919, 929, 959, 979, 2517, 2527, 2547, DX94HP, DX98VHP, Melaka, Saturn, Turbo, 29HP

GENERAL – General Jackson, Grant, Stonewall Jackson, Lee, Washington, A.P. Hill, Longstreet, Sherman

INTEK – model: Multicom-497

MAGNUM – models: 1012, 257, 357, 357DX, 457, Alpha force, Delta Force, Raptor, Mini, Omega Force,S3, S3RF, S6, S9,

MIRAGE – models: 33HP, 44, 88, 99, 2950, 2950EX, 2970, 6600, 88H/L, 9900, MX-36HP, Stealth

NORTH STAR – models: NS-3000, NS-9000

OMEGAFORCE – models: 45

PRESIDENT – models: Grant, J.F.K., Jackson, Lincoln, HR-2510, HR-2600

PRO STAR – model: 240, 400

RANGER / RCI – models: AR-3500, RCI-2900, RCI-2950, RCI-2950-DX, RCI-2970, RCI-2970-DX, RCI-2980-WX, RCI-2985-DX, RCI-2990,RCI-2995-DX, RCI-6300, RCI-6300 Turbo, RCI-6300F-25, RCI-6300F-150, RCI-6900, RCI-6900 Turbo, RCI-6900F-25, RCI-6900F-150, RG-99, Voyage VR-9000, RHF-618

STRYKER – model: 440

SUPERSTAR – model: 121, 122, 36, 3700, 3900, 3900HP, 3900 American Spirit, 3900 HP G, 3900 Gold, 3900GHPA, 3900GHPM, 4800, 4900, Grant

TEK – model: HR-3950

UNIDEN – models: HR-2510, HR-2600

VIRAGE – model: 3300, 3300 HP, VX-38, VX-39

Note: Most of these are either marketed as 10 meter ham radios, or banned for import into USA, or otherwise looked upon with disdain by do-gooders; so they may show up on auction sites, flea markets, non-mainstream cb places, cb websites, or under-the-counter at truck stops.

Additionally:
MOST HAM HF SSB RADIOS – with modifications, can be used on HF Freeband or CB Freeband.
MOST Military Surplus HF SSB manpacks – can be used on HF Freeband or CB Freeband.


Disclaimer: Content provided in RadioMaster Reports is included for the sole purpose of providing educational information on a passive basis. This information may be useful to the public in the event of emergencies or disaster recovery, especially when normal techniques are not an available option. Users of this educational information are solely responsible for their actions.

©2013 RadioMaster Reports



Source link